5: Decadent Oatmeal Feelings

Tory and Mikah talk about a few medicinal sleep aids before interpreting three dreams from listeners. Featuring: house boats, murder scenes, oceans, backpacks, and a number of apocalypses.

Medicinal Sleep Aids

  • Ambien
    • an oral sedative and a nonbenzodiazepine
    • does not cause racism
    • helps you fall asleep more quickly, but isn't intended to help you stay asleep
    • a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist, meaning it encourages production of GABA in the brain
    • Ambien has some hypnotic side effects
    • Ambien can cause dependence
    • In very rare cases, Ambien has had some cognition-improving effect on individuals who have experienced brain damage.
  • Antihistamines
    • work by reducing or blocking histamines
      • histamines are little chemicals created by your body that attach to histamine receptors on certain cells in your body
      • histamine is created in the brain in histamine neurons. Histamine promotes wakefulness in the brain and is very effective at doing so.
      • histamine acts on H1 receptors in the hypothalamus of the brain.
    • antihistamines wiggle their way into the brain and keep histamine from connecting with those receptors, so your brain is like, "OK, time for sleeping now."
    • newer, non-drowsy antihistamines affect the H2 receptors in the brain or don't cross the blood brain barrier at all.
  • Melatonin
    • Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland in our brain. It’s referred to as “the sleep hormone.”
    • Melatonin production is controlled by the Suprachiasmatic Nuclei
      • this magical region of the brain in the hypothalamus is connected to our eyesight and there are photosensitive cells in the nuclei.
      • it's responsible for regulating our 24-hour circadian rhythm.
      • between the neurons and the hormones it activates, it uses about 20,000 neurons to keep our shit running like clockwork.
    • Melatonin helps kick your Stage 1 sleep into gear. You start to feel less alert and want to go to sleep.
    • Melatonin production changes with time.
      • shorter periods of production in the summer, longer periods in winter
      • melatonin production drops with age, too.
    • Studies show that Melatonin is a great coach for our body’s natural sleep-wake cycles.
    • it may also shorten the time it takes you to fall asleep
    • it may also improve sleep quality and increase amount of sleep overall
    • Scientists at Ontario’s University of Guelph found that in more than 71 percent of melatonin supplements, the amount of melatonin was more than 10 percent different from what the product label indicated.
      • some products contained as much as 83 percent less melatonin than was on the label
      • other products contained as much as 478 percent more melatonin than was on the label
  • Rozerem
    • a melatonin agonist, meaning it encourages production of melatonin in the brain
    • the only prescription sleep medication not classified as a controlled substance
    • most don’t get the groggy hangover feeling you can sometimes get from other prescription sleep aids
    • OK for long-term use, unlike drugs like Ambien
    • as a prescription medication, it's held to higher standards and regulated better than something like melatonin supplements

Dreams

  • Listener Tyler: A dream about a boat house, a giant wall of water, a bathroom murder scene, and prophecy.
  • Listener Brian: A dream about a boat, backpack swimmers, a wedding, and an ever-encroaching ocean.
  • Listener Brad: Many dreams about many (creative) apocalypses.

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Sources

4: That's Magic, Baby

Tory and Mikah explore the history of dreams in mythology before interpreting three dreams from listeners. Featuring: space, dead bodies, wizards, smart home tech, and drama club.

Dreams in Mythology

  • Greek & Roman Mythology
    • Oneiroi: Morpheus, Phobetor, and Phantasos
    • Dreams are messages from the gods.
  • Norse Mythology
    • Dreams can predict the future.
    • Dreams are messages from the gods.
    • Dreams are a way to speak with mystical beings.
  • Egyptian Mythology
    • Egyptian dream dictionaries were among the first examples of dream interpretation.
    • Dreams were sorted between good omens and bad omens.
  • Hawaiian Mythology
    • Dreams are "soul sleep," a time to communicate with one's ancestral guardians.
    • Dreams can teach us songs, dances, cures for ailments, and provide us with guidance.
  • Japanese Mythology
    • The Baku is a mostly benevolent dream devourer shaped from a bear, elephant, and ox. It will eat away one's nightmares.
  • Nightmares
    • Nightmares aren't dark, spooky horses. Mares are a mythological fiend that rests on the chest of sleeping victims, suffocating them.
    • Many, many languages have a word for nightmare that uses "mare" as its root.
    • It was believed that sage, blessed amulets, the Baku, a dreamcatcher, a prayer, a worry doll, and more could ward off nightmares.

Dreams

  • Listener Markus: A dream about space, dead bodies, competence, and, perplexingly, a kitten in a fish bowl.
  • Listener Brian: A dream about a whimsical wizard that loves to talk about smart home tech — particularly his smart trash can and smart sewing machine.
  • Listener Wei: A dream about drama club, sponsorship, leadership, and anxiety.

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3: Ankle to Tentacle

Tory and Mikah discuss environmental sleep disrupters (like artificial light and temperature) before interpreting three dreams from listeners.

Environmental Sleep Disrupters

  • Light (particularly artificial light)
  • Sound (but not white noise)
  • Temperature (cool down your bedroom for better sleep)
  • Bed mates (kick your partner or pet out of your bed; your body will thank you)

Dreams

  • Listener Tai: A dream about hiding dead bodies and trying to cover one's tracks.
  • Listener Trinity: A dream about a dance on a frozen pond with a tentacled beast hiding beneath.
  • Listener Shannon: A dream about crumbling teeth falling out of one's mouth.

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2: The Known Zone

Tory and Mikah discuss consumable sleep disrupters (like caffeine and spicy foods) before interpreting two dreams from listeners.

Consumable Sleep Disrupters

  • Caffeine
  • Alcohol

Honorable Mentions

  • Nicotine
  • Chocolate
  • Spicy, Fatty, and Sugary Foods
  • Marijuana?

Send in your dreams:

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Sources

1: A Tiny Hatchet and a Negroni

Tory and Mikah explain the four stages of sleep (N1, N2, N3, and REM) and the sleep cycle before sharing their own dreams and trading dream interpretations.

Send in your dreams:

• email: dreams@lucid.show

• site: lucid.show

Follow us on Twitter: @Lucid_Podcast

Stages of sleep

  • N1 (Stage 1)
  • N2 (Stage 2)
  • N3 (Stage 3)
  • REM

The sleep cycle

  • N1 » N2 » N3 » N2 » N1 » REM

Sources

OpenStax, Psychology. OpenStax CNX. Feb 28, 2018

The history of sleep science - The Guardian

Non-REM (NREM) sleep - HowSleepWorks

REM sleep - HowSleepWorks

What are brainwaves? - Symphonic Mind

Stages of sleep - American Sleep Association

Stages of sleep and sleep cycles - Tuck Sleep